The case for teaching financial literacy in the workplace





Financial Literacy has been a hot topic for several years now, and schools across the country are beginning to integrate financial literacy programming into their curriculum. But while youth are improving their financial literacy skills at school, an important group of people who could benefit from financial literacy education have been forgotten: adults in the workplace.



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October Webinar Series





This month we'll be hosting a series of webinars on our various programs. Sign up to learn more and ask all of your burning questions!

October 3rd, 12pm-1pm PT, Money Matters
Celebrate Financial Literacy Month with Money Matters: Central & Western Canada


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Learner Story: Saliha Muslum





My name is Saliha. I am from Syria and I have been in Canada for three years, I used to live in Turkey before coming to Canada. The reason for coming to Canada was because of the war happening in Syria and it was no longer a safe place for me and my family. 



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Printing company sees success with workplace training program





Canada’s largest printer of hardcover books is one of the latest companies jumping at the opportunity to upgrade their employees’ skills. Friesens Corporation, based in Altona, Manitoba, was one of 15 workplaces across the country to take part in a workplace delivery pilot of UP Skills for Work, a free program from ABC Life Literacy Canada that trains workers on nine important soft skills.



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New financial literacy program available for people with diverse abilities





Like many students, Jenna Martinuzzi wasn't taught how to spend wisely or budget her money in school. So, when her mother suggested she take part in a pilot program designed to teach students with various abilities about everything from how interest works to the basics of daily banking opportunities, Martinuzzi jumped at the opportunity.



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Financial literacy program proving to be effective in minority communities





Statistically speaking, new immigrants and Indigenous Peoples are more likely to face financial stress. In fact, some studies suggest that as many as 15% of individuals in Aboriginal communities may not even have a bank account. For newcomers to Canada, the challenge is very different. While a high proportion of new immigrants are well-educated, many struggle to find work, thus hindering their earning capabilities. Enter ABC Life Literacy Canada.



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Connecting tech-savvy youths with adult learners





Version française à suivra.

Many young Canadians have grown up with technology as a constant in their lives. They’ve always had the Internet at their fingertips; mobile devices and tablets always on-hand to be kept up-to-date on the latest news. For these Canadians, the rapidly changing demands of technology are expected and exciting, with the introduction of new devices promising to make everyday tasks easier and quicker.



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Introduction to Money Matters Pilot





Like many students, Jenna Martinuzzi wasn't taught how to spend wisely or budget her money in school. So, when her mother suggested she take part in a pilot program designed to teach students with various abilities about everything from how interest works to the basics of daily banking opportunities, Martinuzzi jumped at the opportunity.



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Community Profile: Hants Learning Network Association







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ABC Money Matters Workshops Augment Financial Literacy Classes in Quebec





Last September, schools across Quebec added a new mandatory two credit course in financial literacy to the Secondary 5 (Grade 11) curriculum for high school students. The course aims to address issues such as credit scores, loans, making a budget and signing a cell phone contract.



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